Texas governor trashes newspapers

Candidates for high political office usually grovel for newspaper endorsements. Not Texas Gov. Rick Perry. Breaking from a decades-old tradition, the governor isn’t even bothering to meet with editorial writers, much less ask for their blessing.

The way Perry sees it, newspapers are old news and have lost much of their influence. In a rapidly changing media climate, Perry said he decided before the March primaries that seeking their endorsements was a waste of time. After winning by 20 percentage points, the governor said he sees no reason to switch strategies in his race against Democrat Bill White.

New website follows the campaign money trail

Sid Salter writes in The Clarion-Ledger: “For public policy wonks, the Mississippi Center for Public Policy’s new “Seethespending.org” website is going to be as addictive as the Madden 2010 video game is for football fans.

“The Mississippi Center for Public Policy, a non-partisan and non-profit think tank located in Jackson, has built the new searchable database that allows people who register on the site to search state spending by vendor, by agency or by category.”

CBS chief: We have the content for flashy devices

CBS Corp. CEO Les Moonves made a convincing argument for the viability of Old Media during a recent speech before college students in Austin:  “It’s still the content, stupid.

His argument was simple: All these devices and platforms may be changing the way we consume media, but they’re not changing the content we consume on that media. Well-produced, high-quality content will win out on any platform, and the deep-pocketed networks (CBS in particular, of course) are still the ones producing that “professional content” without which the new-media innovations wouldn’t have any real value.

Welcome to Inkblots

Inkblots is a blog from the Mississippi Press Association, covering items of interest to our 125-member newspapers and others interested in the Fourth Estate.

This blog, launched in 1996, is administered by the staff of MPA and is edited by executive director Layne Bruce, a longtime newspaper reporter, editor and publisher. To submit items or tips to Inkblots, click here.